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Our 2014-2015 Concert Season

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Electro-Colors

Electro-Colors
  • Zeremonie - Huck Hodge
  • Dérive 1 - Pierre Boulez
  • Treize couleurs du soleil couchant - Tristan Murail
  • Alêtheia (U.S. Premiere) - Huck Hodge

Saturday, November 15, 2014, 8:00 PM
Pre-concert presentation at 7:30 PM
The Chapel in the Good Shepherd Center
Click to buy tickets online

Seattle Modern Orchestra opens its 2014-2015 season with a U.S. premiere from Rome Prize winning American composer Huck Hodge. Hodge’s Alêtheia for ensemble is a communicative, powerful and dramatic work that recently won the International Society for Contemporary Music’s League of Composers Competition. Also on this program are works from two celebrated composers, Pierre Boulez and Tristan Murail. These two works, composed only 6 years apart, helped shape the progression of avant-garde music in France during that time. Boulez’s jubilatory late period work Dérive 1 (1984) exults warmth and radiance with simmering and shimmering textures of ornate melodic figures supported by rich harmonic progression. Murail’s 1978 work Treize couleurs du soleil couchant (thirteen colors of sundown) is a key piece from the early Spectralist movement that plunges the audience into the evocative resonances of sound.

21st Century Violin

21st Century Violin
  • Sequenza VIII - Luciano Berio
  • Le Stagioni Artificiali (U.S. Premiere) - Salvatore Sciarrino
  • NEW WORK for violin and ensemble (World Premiere) - Jérémy Jolley
  • Spiri - Franco Donatoni

Saturday, April 11, 2015, 8:00 PM
Pre-concert presentation at 7:30 PM
The Chapel in the Good Shepherd Center
Click to buy tickets online

Seattle Modern Orchestra welcomes Australian violinist Graeme Jennings in a special concert for the 21st century violin. Jennings, former second violinist of the celebrated Arditti String Quartet with over 70 recordings and more than 300 world premieres, will perform a world premiere written for Jennings by SMO co-Artistic Director, Jérémy Jolley. Jennings will also perform three works by three masters of Italian contemporary music: Luciano Berio, Salvatore Sciarrino, and Franco Donatoni. Berio’s Sequenza VIII (1976) for solo violin pushes virtuosity to new heights with rustlings of Bach’s Chaconne and a Paganini Caprice. Sciarrino’s Le Stagioni Artificiali (2006) leads us to the subtle thresholds of different acoustic environments (U.S. premiere) while Donatoni’s Spiri (1977), dedicated to Sciarrino, is a joyful extroverted piece with dancing rhythms and modal sonorities that support floating melodic arcs in solo violin and oboe.

Sound Me Out

Photo by Richard Burbridge
Photo by Richard Burbridge
  • Door (Seattle Premiere) - Kate Soper
  • Blood on the floor, Painting 1986 (Seattle Premiere) - Fausto Romitelli
  • Now is Forever: I. Orpheus and Eurydice (World Premiere) - Kate Soper
  • Monodie (Seattle Premiere) - Georg Friedrich Haas

Saturday, June 6, 2015, 8:00 PM
Pre-concert presentation at 7:30 PM
The Chapel in the Good Shepherd Center
Click to buy tickets online

For its season finale, Seattle Modern Orchestra presents American composer and Guggenheim fellow Kate Soper who will perform two works for soprano and ensemble, including a world premiere of a new ensemble version of her 2012 piece, now is forever: I. Orpheus and Eurydice for soprano and orchestra with text by Jorie Graham, written specifically for SMO. Now is forever explores a discrete moment in the story of Orpheus and Eurydice when the pair meets, that perceptually expands in time. Door (2007) for soprano, flute, saxophone, electric guitar and accordion with text written by Martha Collins exudes a wide emotional range from buoyant and playful to dark and moody. The finale concert will also include two Seattle premieres from celebrated Italian composer Fausto Romitelli and Austrian composer Georg Friedrich Hass. Romitelli’s Blood on the floor, Painting 1986 (2000), inspired by the Francis Bacon painting of the same name, emphasizes the violence and destructiveness of projecting reality into fiction. Friedrich Haas’s Monodie for 18 instruments weaves the melodic narrative through the fabric of a virtuosic and highly focused ensemble sound, effectively turning the ensemble into a virtual solo instrument.